To learn the tools, tactics and motives involved in computer and network attacks, and share the lessons learned.

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The Honeynet Project Workshop 2017 in Canberra, Australia

Canberra 2017
 
The Honeynet Project Workshop 2017
University of New South Wales
Canberra, Australia
November 15th-17th, 2017
 
https://canberra2017.honeynet.org/
 

GSoC 2017 Project Summary: Glutton improvements, the new “all eating honeypot”

Student Mohammad Bilal contributed this post as a project summary of his GSoC2017 experience. 

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GSoC 2017 Summary: ReDroid toolbox

This is a contribution by GSoC student Ziyue Yang, find him on Github yzygitzh. Read more »

Heralding GSoC17 Report

The summer is coming to the end as well as my GSoC17 happy days. So, now it’s time to sum up the results and say goodbye to the GSoC until the next year.

My impressions about working on the Heralding project

Working on the Heralding project was awesome experience for me. I feel I did something helpful, fun and challenging at the same time. I hadn’t wanted anything else before the summer! Read more »

Mitmproxy Google Summer of Code 17 Summary

Hi, I’m Matthew Shao from China. This year, I got the honor to be selected as a Google Summer of Code student for the mitmproxy project. With the help of my kindly mentors Maximilian Hils and Clemens Brunner, I managed to improve the source code of mitmweb, which is a web interface for mitmproxy, and added some exciting new features for it. Here I’m going to present you the work I’ve done during this fulfilling summer. Read more »

GSoC 2017: First Month Progress

GSoC Logo

At the end of February we were very happy to announce that The Honeynet Project had once again been selected to be a mentoring organization for Google Summer of Code (GSoC) 2017. Since then, there has a been a flurry of activity: We received more than 50 project proposals during the application phase, selected 14 fantastic students, set them up to work with us during the community bonding period, and now completed the first month of actual work! Now that the first tangible results are tickling in, it’s time to take a closer look at our students and see what they have achieved so far. Read more »

Thoughts on the Active Cyber Defense Certainty Act 2.0

On May 25, 2017, Representative Tom Graves released the second draft of proposed amendments to 18 U.S.C. 1030 (known as the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act). Representative Graves’ bill is known as the Active Cyber Defense Certainty Act (or ACDC Act). There is no universally accepted umbrella term for this, but it is variously called “Active Defense”, “Active Cyber Defense”, “hacking back,” “hackback”, and “strike back.” You will find the word “active” applied almost universally in these discussions, though it frequently results in establishing a simple (though false) dichotomy of “passive defense” vs. “active defense” and frequently leading to fallacious “straw man” arguments. I prefer the term “Active Response Continuum” to explicitly avoid setting up such binary choices. [Dittrich and Himma(2005)]
Without technical knowledge and a clear contextual understanding of the criminal actions, potentially triggering legal defensive response, two paradoxes emerge. First, the “attributional technology” cited in the draft ACDC Act may not achieve its desired goals. Second, some actions disallowed by the ACDC Act include previously witnessed “strike back” actions that have motivated calls for the kind of amendments embodied in the ACDC Act. [Robinson(2017)]
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Dionaea honeypot: from Conficker to WannaCry + SambaCry CVE 2017-7494

This is a contribution by Tan Kean Siong, follow him on Twitter @gento_ .

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GSoC 2016 Wrap Up: Mitmproxy

With Google Summer of Code (GSoC) 2017 being around the corner, we’d like to do a short flashback to 2016, our most successful GSoC year for mitmproxy so far! GSoC 2016 was mitmproxy’s fourth time participating in the program under the umbrella of the Honeynet Project. For the first time, we were able to mentor three students over the summer to work on both our Python core and the brand new web interface. As a major milestone, mitmproxy is now a Python 3 project and has a fantastic user interface that even works on Windows. Read more »

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